TED Stories

A portrait-based idea where I took ten different stories from the website: TED Talks. I wanted to bring the stories to life through the medium of  photography.

wrestler 1

TO THIS DAY … FOR THE BULLIED AND BEAUTIFUL

By turn hilarious and haunting, poet Shane Koyczan puts his finger on the pulse of what it’s like to be young and … different. “To This Day,” his spoken-word poem about bullying, captivated millions as a viral video (created, crowd-source style, by 80 animators). Here, he gives a glorious, live reprise with back story and violin accompaniment by Hannah Epperson.

– Man wearing wrestling costume becomes a writer- sitting at office desk with typewriter or computer – looking straight into camera – dull expression – with bag on desk and pens aside.

kiane dog 1

THE JOBS WE’LL LOSE TO MACHINES — AND THE ONES WE WON’T

Machine learning isn’t just for simple tasks like assessing credit risk and sorting mail anymore — today, it’s capable of far more complex applications, like grading essays and diagnosing diseases. With these advances comes an uneasy question: Will a robot do your job in the future?

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TAKING BACK CONTROL: LIES, COMPULSION AND RECOVERY | SHAMIL GILLANI:

A beautiful family and financial security is what most dream of. For Shamil Gillani the lure of gambling resulted in him nearly losing everything which he held so dear.

frankie mustard 1

HOW YARN BOMBING GREW INTO A WORLDWIDE MOVEMENT:

Textile artist Magda Sayeg transforms urban landscapes into her own playground by decorating everyday objects with colorful knit and crochet works. These warm, fuzzy “yarn bombs” started small, with stop sign poles and fire hydrants in Sayeg’s hometown, but soon people found a connection to the craft and spread it across the world. “We all live in this fast-paced, digital world, but we still crave and desire something that’s relatable,” Sayeg says. “Hidden power can be found in the most unassuming places, and we all possess skills that are just waiting to be discovered.”

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MY MUSHROOM BURIAL SUIT

Here’s a powerful provocation from artist Jae Rhim Lee. Can we commit our bodies to a cleaner, greener Earth, even after death? Naturally — using a special burial suit seeded with pollution-gobbling mushrooms. Yes, this just might be the strangest TEDTalk you’ll ever see …

frankie 1

MR. LORRAINE: LIFE WITH A MAN’S VOICE | LORRAINE CHADEMUNHU:

Lorraine was born with a voice that some people believe belongs to a man. For most of her life she has been ridiculed, humiliated, judged and accused of being a fraud. Her story is about not hiding and refusing to apologise for not fitting society’s definition of femininity. Lorraine Chademunhu was born and raised in Zimbabwe. She moved to the UK 20 years ago and works in Mental Health. Lorraine is a mother, poet, rapper, DJ and stand-up comedian. She lives to inspire people to be true to themselves and not be defined by others’ opinions. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

betty

I SURVIVED A TERRORIST ATTACK. HERE’S WHAT I LEARNED:

Gill Hicks’s story is one of compassion and humanity, emerging from the ashes of chaos and hate. A survivor of the London terrorist bombings on July 7, 2005, she shares her story of the events of that day — and the profound lessons that came as she learned how to live on.

molly ella choice

HOW I LEARNED TO COMMUNICATE MY INNER LIFE WITH ASPERGER’S:

Alix Generous is a young woman with a million and one ideas — she’s done award-winning science, helped develop new technology and tells a darn good joke (you’ll see). She has Asperger’s, a form of autistic spectrum disorder that can impair the basic social skills required for communication, and she’s worked hard for years to learn how to share her thoughts with the world. In this funny, personal talk, she shares her story — and her vision for tools to help more people communicate their big ideas.

base ball choice choice

BRIAN GOLDMAN: DOCTORS MAKE MISTAKES. CAN WE TALK ABOUT THAT?

Every doctor makes mistakes. But, says physician Brian Goldman, medicine’s culture of denial (and shame) keeps doctors from ever talking about those mistakes, or using them to learn and improve. Telling stories from his own long practice, he calls on doctors to start talking about being wrong.